Author: Steve Lumley

One in five teachers planning to leave profession

An exodus of teachers is set to leave the profession within the next two years, a union survey reveals. According to the findings from the National Education Union (NEU), one in five teachers say they are planning to leave the profession within the next two years. They say their decision has been spurred on by excessive workloads. More worryingly, 40% of teachers and school leaders say they will leave teaching in the next five years. In addition to the high workload, teachers say they are under pressure from excessive accountability and they also point to pressures of dealing with...

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Prospective teachers failed skills test with marking error

Any prospective teacher that failed a skills test to take up teacher training is to be offered compensation by the Department for Education because there was an error in the marking. It’s believed that hundreds of potential candidates failed the test and the marking error had been in place for at least 10 years. Nick Gibb, the schools’ minister, says the error in the QTS literary skills test led to hundreds of candidates failing. The DfE says that between September 2017 and November 2018, more than 200 candidates failed the skills test when they should have passed it. However,...

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Skills training boost with ‘Institutes of Technology’

The government has unveiled 12 Institutes of Technology with the aim of providing a vocational alternative to university. The move will see young people receiving high-quality skills training in England. The Institutes will be based around universities and colleges with support from various local employers. Of the 12 new Institutes, four are in London, two are located in the West Midlands with the remaining six in York, Exeter, Swindon, Durham, Milton Keynes and Somerset. Prime Minister Theresa May said the new institutions will help counter the ‘outdated perceptions’ that were biased against the delivery of vocational skills. However, the...

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Newly qualified teachers ‘barely earn the minimum wage’

Because of the hours they work, and their rates of pay, some newly qualified teachers barely earn more than the national minimum wage, one teachers’ union warns. Ahead of its first conference, the National Education Union says teachers’ pay will dominate proceedings along with teacher welfare issues. The joint general secretaries of the union, Kevin Courtney and Dr Mary Bousted, say that the issue over pay is growing in importance among members. The growing anger follows the unprecedented decision last year by the government to ignore the School Teachers Review Body’s recommendation that all teachers receive a 3.5% pay...

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Just three in 10 headteachers say GCSEs prepare students for work

The number of headteachers who believe that GCSEs help to prepare pupils for the world of work has fallen with just three in 10 heads believing this is the case. However, the figures from Ofqual also highlight that growing numbers of people are now understanding the new GCSE grading scale of 9 to 1. The data from Ofqual looks at the perceptions of A-levels and GCSEs and highlights that just 31% of headteachers agreed in 2018 that GCSEs ‘are a good preparation for work’. In 2017, the proportion of heads who believed the statement to be true was 42%....

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