Month: December 2018

Universities increasingly accept lower grades

Growing numbers of 18-year-olds with poor A-level grades are being accepted onto university courses, according to Ucas. The university admissions service says that the proportion of 18-year-olds who have achieved three grade C’s or lower at A-level has risen to 84%, from 79% recorded five years ago. Ucas also says that those applicants that had the equivalent of three grade D’s had a university application acceptance rate of more than 80%. One reason for the rise, Ucas says, is that universities are increasingly struggling to recruit 18-year-olds because there has been a fall in student numbers. The data also...

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The worst primary schools in England revealed

An official list published by the government shows the standard for performances in primary schools and it reveals which are the worst performing ones in England. The list contains 364 schools that did not meet the floor standard for their performance in 2017/18. The Department for Education says that the list of primary schools failing to meet standards is down from the 365 they recorded last year. The performance threshold monitors a pupil’s progress across several subjects with particular attention given to maths and English. Nick Gibb, the school standards’ minister, said: “Standards are rising in schools with 86%...

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Decline in Scotland’s teacher numbers ‘hidden’ by scheme

A scheme to help children from poor backgrounds in Scotland who fall behind in literacy is helping to prop up school budgets and hide the decline in teacher numbers, unions say. Scotland’s largest teaching union, the Educational Institute of Scotland (EIS), says that the money is being used to ‘prop up the number of teachers in schools’. In a bid to bridge the attainment gap between poor and rich children, headteachers are given £120 million every year to boost literacy skills. Now, the EIS says that while children from poor backgrounds are continuing to fall behind, temporary teachers are...

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Job cut fears at struggling universities

The New Year could bring a round of job cuts at struggling universities after warnings over political uncertainty and deteriorating balance sheets raised redundancy fears. Unions say that the reduction in university staff numbers will send out the ‘wrong signal to potential students’. The universities have warned staff to be prepared for redundancies because of lower forecasts for student recruitment, sudden shifts in government policy and Brexit uncertainty. Over the last few days, half a dozen universities have been informing staff that jobs could be lost in 2019, including those at Russell Group universities, including Cardiff University. One national...

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Primary schools score poorly on curriculum quality

An inspection trial for Ofsted’s new school curriculum has shown that just eight of the 33 primaries inspected had a strong curriculum. In comparison, more than half of secondary schools were found to have a strong curriculum in the inspection trial. The inspectorate also found that 15 of the primaries inspected finished in the bottom two of its five ratings, with three secondaries doing so. Ofsted visited the primary and secondary schools in a bid to test how they would inspect the implementation, intent and impact of the school curriculum for the new inspection framework – which will be...

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