Month: July 2018

Exclusions rise for the third year running

The number of pupils being excluded from school has risen for the third year in a row, data has revealed. Headteachers say that cuts to the budgets for behaviour and mental health programmes are partly to blame. However, the figures highlight that around 40 pupils every day are being permanently excluded from school. The figures come from the Department for Education and reveal that in 2016-17, 0.1% of pupils from all schools were excluded. However, in 2015-16 the figure for pupils being expelled had risen to 0.08%. Third year running that there has been a rise in exclusions This...

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Sex education will be compulsory in all schools

The teaching of sex education is to be made compulsory in England’s secondary and primary schools, along with lessons in healthy living and well-being, the government has announced. Also, under the plans, a 15-year-old will be able to overrule their parents’ wishes and decide whether they will opt into sex education lessons they may have been withdrawn from previously. Damian Hinds, the Education Secretary, says youngsters should be able to request sex education before they turn 16. Up until that point, parents will have the right to withdraw their child from sex education classes. The plans have been unveiled...

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New national funding formula for schools is delayed

A plan to introduce a new national funding formula for schools will not now take place until 2021. The government says the delay is to help support a ‘smooth transition’ to the new formula. The formula was officially launched last September with the aim of dealing with historic disparities between funding levels in local areas. The formula will bypass local authorities and distribute funds to schools around the country more fairly, using a single set of guiding principles. The transition period was to be two years, during which time local authorities are to continue allocating their funds based on...

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Bright but poor pupils lose out at GCSE

Nearly half of pupils who are bright but poor and who excelled at their studies while at primary school will fail to get top GCSE grades, a new analysis reveals. The education charity, The Sutton trust, says there is a class gap opening up by the time pupils leave primary school. They found that just 4% of poor children are in the top academic 10% when in primary school, compared with 13% of wealthier pupils. In a report, the trust says that disadvantaged children who have achieved the highest grades while in primary school have fallen behind by the...

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Pupils get holidays anti-knife crime lessons

In a bid to reduce knife crime in England and Wales, pupils are receiving lessons in anti-knife crime before they break up for the summer holidays. The lessons are being provided by the Home Office and are being added to the end of term activities which usually consist of school trips, sports days and concerts. The aim is to reduce the risk of knife crime occurring over the summer break. The lessons tell young people that it’s a myth to believe it’s safer for them to carry a knife. Victoria Atkins, the crime minister, says young people need to...

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