Month: January 2017

Sixth form funding is stretched, admits Gibb

Schools minister Nick Gibb has admitted that sixth form funding is stretched, in a parliamentary questions session this week. Schools week reports that Gibb said funding was ‘tight’ with reference to funding given to schools for 16-19 year olds, compared with that for younger pupils and pupils in higher education. The Sixth Form Colleges Association (SFCA) is calling for a fund review for school sixth forms and colleges. Currently, schools sixth forms and colleges receive an average of 20 percent less per pupil than schools, and 47 percent less than universities. In an unusual departure from the government line...

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Toby Salt takes top job at AQA

Toby Salt has taken the top job at exam board AQA, Schools Week reports. Salt is currently the chief executiveof Ormiston Academies Trust (OAT), and will succeed Andrew Hall in the top job at AQA, when Hall retires later this year. Salt has said it will be “real wrench” to leave OAT for the top job at AQA, but has said his new role coincides with a “critical time for education”, ahead of major qualification reforms this year. Salt will step in to the role in July this year, for a transition period until the end of August, when...

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Over testing is a myth, says new Ofsted chief

The new Ofsted chief, Amanda Spielman has said that over testing is a myth, in reference to exam pressure on pupils. The TES reports that Spielman has defended the UK’s exams approach saying it does not amount to over testing. She cited the work of academic Tim Oates, research director at Cambridge assessment, who conducted numerous comparative studies on international testing regimes. Spielman said his research: “…[seemed] to conclude that, actually, it adds up to much the same amount of testing as in most other systems”. In a conversation with the publication, Spielman discussed over testing, as well as...

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Poor public transport cuts off rural pupils

Three out of five rural pupils in rural England, do not have adequate transport links to travel to secondary school, Rural England has said. The State Of Rural Services Report says that poor public transport links are damaging opportunities in education, the BBC reports. Concerns have also been raised about lack of access to broadband in rural areas. Margaret Clark of Rural England has said rural pupils are losing out because of poor public transport. The report expresses concern that rural pupils’ choices in secondary and further education are unfairly limited, because public transport can be unreliable and expensive....

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Tottenham Hotspur FC & top private schools to open new sixth form

Top private schools including Harrow have joined forces with Tottenham Hotspur football club and Highgate school to open a new sixth form. The new sixth form, to be called the London Academy of Excellence, will open this autumn on the site of the new Spurs stadium, and will help bright local teenagers get into the best universities or land top jobs. Eight top private schools, which also include Alleyn’s, Chigwell, Mill Hill, North London Collegiate, St Albans, St Dunstan’s and Haberdashers’ Aske’s Boys’, will share their expertise and teaching staff with the new sixth form. The £18,000-a-year Highgate school,...

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