Month: December 2016

Term-time holiday case headed to Supreme Court

The long running legal wrangle over whether parents should be permitted to absent their children from school for term-time holidays is to be heard by the Supreme Court, the BBC reports. The original case brought by Isle of Wight Council, which tried to fine Jon Platt £120 for taking his daughter out of school for a family trip to Florida, was lost by the council in the magistrates’ court. The council then appealed to the High Court, where they lost again. The Supreme Courts has now allowed the case to be heard by it, meaning it will be the...

Read More

Top unis say slashing student visas is ‘economic self-harm’

Leading universities in London have dubbed government proposals to dramatically reduce international student visas ‘economic self-harm’. Joining numerous signatories in a letter from London interest group, London First, universities including UCL, King’s College and the LSE said they were ‘hugely concerned’ by the proposals to cut student visas to the UK by almost half. They called on government ministers to stop treating students as a ‘soft target’, in an attempt to appease anti-immigration sentiment, and demonstrate that students are welcome. Reports earlier this month had suggested the Home Office was considering cutting student visas for overseas students from 300,000...

Read More

New ICT GCSE risks disadvantaging girls, minority and poor student

The BBC is reporting that the government’s new look ICT GCSE, which focuses on computer science and coding, is running the risk of disadvantaging girls, poor and ethnic minority students. The new ICT GCSE was designed to address concerns among government ministers that ICT teaching was too basic, and the subject was taken off the curriculum four years ago. The subject was not re-introduced, with schools having to enter students through an opt-in system. Now, official figures for how well the new system is working, have been released by academics at the University of Roehampton. Just 28 percent of...

Read More

Uni admissions officers favour the International Baccalaureate (IB)

Findings from the Annual University Admissions Officers Report which were recently released, say that 97 percent of admissions officers favour the International Baccalaureate (known as a Diploma Programme (DP) type system) as the best preparation for higher education. The report appeared in a story by Schools Improvement. Admissions officers were asked to score the IB and A-Levels out of five, against criteria such as ‘encouraging independent inquiry,’ ‘encouraging citizenship’ and ‘developing self-management skills.’ In an averaging of the rankings, 97 percent of admissions officers scored the DP four or five out of five, compared to 87 percent being scored...

Read More

Female teachers earn 6.4% less, study says

The TES is reporting that, a new online tool showing the pay gap in different professions, reveals a 6.4 percent pay gap between female and male secondary teachers, with females earning £1.53 less an hour than male teachers. The government figures revealed disparities in different sectors of education. In primary and nursery education, female teachers are paid 0.5 percent more on average than their male colleagues. The online comparison tool was launched by Justine Greening, who is the responsible minister for women and equalities, as well as being education secretary. The average hourly figures were calculated using media pay...

Read More